Asics GelLyte V Sanze Knit Mid Grey/ Mid Grey FVOEeuJ

SKU-770273102
Asics Gel-Lyte V Sanze Knit Mid Grey/ Mid Grey FVOEeuJ
Asics Gel-Lyte V Sanze Knit Mid Grey/ Mid Grey
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Keep It Secret, Keep It Safe: WiFi Security for Beginners
Keep It Secret, Keep It Safe: WiFi Security for Beginners
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By Rob Morelli
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Every morning, you ask your digital assistant for the news and weather while you’re getting ready for work. From there, you check the traffic with your smartphone, strap on your smartwatch, set some mood music for your pet for the day, have your digital assistant set your home’s thermostat to “away” mode and head out to the garage. You open your smart garage door before you realize you forgot to turn on your security system — but that’s not a problem, you have an app for that.

All of this technology touch seems perfectly normal these days. Absolutely everyone has a WiFi network at home to feed all of these neat tools that we collectively call the Internet of Things (IoT). Unfortunately, not everyone has a very secure WiFi network, which opens up IoT devices, computers and the network itself to attacks by nefarious types who would use them for tasks you probably didn’t have in mind.

Before you catch Alexa trying to order a DIY rocket kit from Acme without your authorization, let’s go through some basics of WiFi security to keep your home network and IoT devices protected.

There are basically four types of security you’ll find in a wireless router, some are much better at protecting you and your devices than others. As with anything to do with technology, the more modern protocols are going to be better at protecting you than older ones, so if your router is more than a couple of years old it might be time to consider an upgrade. Check this list to see if it has an appropriately secure protocol available first, though:

WEP. Wired Equivalent Privacy is a protocol reaching back to 1999. It was essentially the first wireless security type, so if this is the only option you’ve got available on your router, get yourself to Best Buy. This router cannot deal with modern challenges, bottom line. You might as well not have any internet security.

WPA. WiFi Protected Access was created in 2003 as a response to the many problems with WEP. A new security standard known as Temporal Key Integrity Protocol was developed that was much stronger than the encryption used with WEP, but it still used a similar implementation, so was problematic.

What happens when a company misleads consumers and intentionally pollutes the environment? We asked some of our authors to comment on the recent Volkswagen emissions scandal . Check out what they had to say below and share your own thoughts in the comments.

Jason Mark

Why I'm Suing VW

As an environmentalist, I probably shouldn’t say this, but I love my car.

For starters, I love its exceptional fuel economy—an average of 37.5 miles per gallon in the four years I’ve owned it and typically up to 45 mpg on the highway, a significant boost above the U.S. vehicle fleet average of 23.6 mpg. I love its understated style—sleek, compact, and modern without looking flashy. I’ve even come to love the feline purr of its diesel engine, the little rumble that signals its latent power.

Unfortunately, my dream car is something of a mirage. That’s because I’m the owner of a 2010 Volkswagen Jetta SportWagen TDI, one of the nearly half a million VWs that, as the company now admits, was secretly manipulated to evade U.S. and California clean air regulations. VW sold me, and hundreds of thousands of other Americans, a vehicle whose green promises (“clean diesel!”) were little more than a smoke screen.

Let’s be real: Owning a car is a regrettable necessity in our sprawling, industrial landscape. I’m lucky enough to live in a region—the San Francisco Bay Area—where I don’t have to drive much. I commute by bike and train, and I can get everything I need within walking distance of my home. Most weeks, my car sits curbside gathering dust and leaves. But on the weekends, my family and I like to get away to the seashore, the forests, or the mountains—and for that we need a car.

Continue reading more of Jason's thoughts .

Joseph Fiksel

Ripple Effects: What VW Means for Corporate Sustainabiliity

The deliberate deception on Volkswagen’s part represents a breach of trust that will undoubtedly affect the company’s reputation and brand image for years to come. But the ripple effects of this scandal are even broader. For those who are cynical about capitalist motives, it simply reinforces the unfortunate stereotypes of corporate greed and manipulation. For those who respect the efforts of global corporations to be environmentally and socially responsible, myself included, it represents a setback in public perception of the business community. From my experience, the large majority of companies work hard to uphold their values and ethical standards, and are sincerely dedicated to the sustainability goals that they profess. Occasionally they are guilty of errors in judgment, and we have certainly witnessed a number of incidents where automotive companies clearly failed to protect the safety of their customers. However, even though no one was physically injured by Volkswagen’s actions, the company grossly violated the basic claim of their product—clean diesel engines. This is an unprecedented insult to society, comparable to the Enron scandal, and I expect that in the near term it will taint the credibility of corporate sustainability programs in every industry.

Pavan Sukhdev

Beyond VW: More Automotive Deceit

My book (Island Press, 2012)on the evolution of the Corporation–past, present and future–explored the changes that were needed in policies, prices and institutions to change the DNA of the Corporation. Today's economy and politics is dominated by the ethically challenged DNA of 'Corporation 1920,'steeped in the economic philosophy of Milton Friedman, and guidedsolely by the pursuit of profits, with their goals mis-aligned with society, generating trillions of dollars in social costs: the negative externalities of "business-as-usual."But Iwas able to find and describe many successful instances of the new DNA–corporationswith social purpose, positive externalities, achieving private profits without inflicting public losses. And every so often,Ihear or see something that makes me thinkIhave found another one….

Such was my impression whenIvisited Volkswagen in Wolfsburg a year ago, to teach a seminar.Ilearnedthat their cars and assembly lines were being designed to ensure each model and chassis could take four types of engines: petrol, diesel, hybrid and electric. It seemed a very pragmatic way of staying open to business for a fossil-fuel-free world of tomorrow. But in hindsight, it was more likely a pragmatic way of staying open to a diesel-engine-free future. Volkswagen is guilty ofmisdemeanouron a massive scale but it looks like they are not alone. Recent research by the Institute for Transport Studies at Leeds University, UK,suggests thatMercedes, BMW, Ford, and Mazdadiesel cars are even more polluting than Volkswagen, and up to the same software deceit. How can an entire industry go so wrong? Very simple: by being driven solely by the pursuit of financial profits, totallyignoring the wider world of human, social and natural capital that they depend on and have impacts on. That is why we need a new corporateperformancemeasuring system such as Akzo-Nobel's"4D-PL"concept, see www.corp2020.com . You cannot manage what you do not measure. Accountancy regulators need to wake up from their sleep of a century, andrealisethat thefinancialreporting of 1920 is simply NOT good enough for 2020!

Corporation2020

The composition of the population and the type of health care delivery system will dictate the optimal design of the screening program. The components to consider include who will do the testing ( e.g. , physician, nurse, technician), where the screening will take place ( e.g. , clinic, health fair), and how it will be financially supported.

Previous Section Next Section

Screening for albuminuria in individuals with diabetes has been advocated to be performed once every year. In case of a positive test, it is advocated to repeat testing twice within 3 to 6 mo. If two of the three tests are positive, then treatment to lower albuminuria should be started ( 41 ). Thus far, no hard data are available for the optimal time interval for albuminuria testing in individuals with hypertension or in other groups. As progression of albuminuria may be slower in individuals without diabetes than in individuals with diabetes, it seems acceptable to perform albuminuria testing in individuals with hypertension or other risk categories every 3 yr.

Both in type 1 diabetes ( 50 ) and in the general population ( 51 ), progression and regression of albuminuria can be observed. After 4.2 yr, UAE had regressed in 9.8% individuals in the general population, whereas progression was found in 11.4%. Progression and regression of albuminuria were most prevalent in the group of individuals with a UAE of 15 to 30 mg/d (21.3 and 47.4%, respectively). This suggests that especially in individual with a borderline elevation in UAE, repeated testing every 3 to 5 yr is indicated.

Lowering of BP with agents that interfere with the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, such as ACE inhibitors or ARB is most effective for lowering UAE. It has been shown in patients with manifest renal disease ( i.e. , those with overt proteinuria of >300 mg/d) that the extent to which proteinuria is lowered during treatment predicts the prevention of both CKD and progressive cardiovascular disease ( 20 , 21 ). It is highly likely but not proved that the same will hold true for individuals with microalbuminuria. Thus far, however, we cannot define a certain cutoff level below which albuminuria should be lowered; we suggest use of the same cutoff as for the definition of microalbuminuria: <30 mg/d.

Previous Section Next Section

There is compelling evidence that screening for albuminuria should be carried out in individuals with diabetes. Evidence is accumulating that it also should be implemented in individuals with hypertension and in individuals with increased cardiovascular and renal risk. Further studies are needed to confirm that systematic screening for albuminuria also is cost-effective in the general population. The short-term benefits for prevention of cardiovascular disease may outweigh those of the long-term prevention of ESRD.

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  • Jeremy Bowers

    Interactive news for The New York Times. Foodie. Dilettante oenophile. Espouser of obscure baseball statistics. Beliver in coding hubris. Runes and such.

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